DU protests against Homophobia on Campus

Facebook
Facebook
JanPratinidhi
JanPratinidhi

DU protests against Homophobia on Campus


COLUMNS / The new age movers and shakers   /   Apr 23, 2015
karuna Gupta
karuna Gupta
She is a writer. She has done post-graduation in Political Science from Delhi University. She likes writing news stories, blogs and articles. She also likes to analyze political and international events and write stories on them. She wishes to bring a change to the lives of women by attracting the attention of leaders as well as society at large through her articles. Truth is what she stands for.

786
VIEWS
Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, Transgenders, Queers (LGBTQ) on the Delhi University Campus have been suffering from long, the injustices done to them and they no longer desire to remain silent. It seems they have now entered no-tolerance zone.

Hence, DU students are organizing a protest at the Faculty of Arts on Friday, 24th March to express their anger against alleged violence against LGBTQ students on campus. A Facebook page called “Zero Tolerance: Resisting Campus Violence Against LGBTQ” has been created.

The description on the page says, "There've been instances where LGBTQ students have been subject to mockery, abuse and bullying because of their sexual or gender identities. Each time, the cases go unreported because the university lacks primary grievance redressal mechanisms and the victims often do not wish to have their identities revealed... We want to send the message that violence against LGBTQ students won't be tolerated and the university must come up with measures to address complaints of bullying and harassment."

Gender Studies Group of Delhi University tries to bridge the gap between the Theory and Practice of Gender Equality by organizing events, holding group meetings every week and publishing a journal.

In October 2013, the Gender Studies Group, an informal gathering of Delhi University students got Taksh Sharma, a transgender to speak up at the panel discussion on “Sexual minorities in DU” led by Ashley Tellis, DU’s first openly gay teacher.

Sharma, a first-year English student at a South Campus college was one of the six DU students to speak about their experience of being gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender or queer on campus. He said, “Everyone assumes I’m just a really flamboyant gay”, and he was frequently asked to “tone it down.” He recounted an incident in which a police van stopped him to question him about his make-up and nail paint when he was waiting for an auto. The police thought that he was a hooker.

He mentioned that he was privileged that he could sit and get an education. He said that he had a very loving family.

An economics student, Manish Jain mentioned about “pervasive homophobia” on campus which reflected by no discussion on the issue.
Tellis joined DU in 1999. He said that things were really bad then, but changed much in the intervening decade. He used to get mails with “Hizra Tellis” or “Homo Tellis” on it.

Vikramaditya Sahay, a student of Political science, was called everything but straight. He identified himself simply as gender “queer” rejecting the ‘L’, G’, ‘B’ and ‘T’. If you accept this “they’ve got you”. “Genderqueerness” rejects the man-woman binary as well. He wore a red silk kurta and a grey dupatta. “The class is where you need to disturb people,” he argued, “Wearing heels to class does just that.”

Isha Sharma spoke of being the only lesbian she knew in a women’s college. There is a tendency to dismiss lesbians as testosterones are absent. People expect that she will become heterosexual, once she graduates. Nishta Tewari and Zeeshan Akhtar were both bisexual.

They had been asked if they’ve had sex with both groups and if not, how do they know their orientation. To dispel such ignorance, the Gender Studies group will release a batch of FAQ booklets that would cover the same-sex, body, sexual harassment and accommodation.

Priya Vedi, a 31-year old doctor at All India Institute of Medical Sciences committed suicide by slitting her wrist in a hotel room in Paharganj. She accused her husband of mentally torturing her after she learnt that he was a gay. Her husband Kamal Vedi (34), a dermatologist at AIIMS was remanded in 14-days’ judicial custody by a local court.

According to the police, the couple got married five years ago and, soon after the marriage Priya came to know that her husband was “gay.”
Priya said that she had “accepted” it, but was ready to live with it. She, however, added that subsequent torture by her husband led to the extreme step.

Through the protest the students want to show solidarity with the LGBTQ community. They want to show that all have equal rights and any form of violence against them will not be tolerated.

The views expressed here are those of the authors and doesn’t reflect the official policy of Janpratinidhi. The views expressed here are those of the authors and doesn’t reflect the official policy of Janpratinidhi.
786
VIEWS
Previous Post

Kalyan Jewellers rem...

New Delhi The Bollywood actress Aishwarya Rai Bachchcan is again in the news not...
Headlines
Next Post

SOLAR ENERGY REVOLUT...

The greed of us in India is legendary We only have to see an opportunity and th...
Environment